GSD Schemes / The Breed



BEFORE OUR DOGS ARE BRED THEY ARE REQUIRED TO MEET STRINGENT BREED STANDARDS, SET BY BOTH THE GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA INC AND THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL KENNEL COUNCIL INC. BUT MOST IMPORTANTLY BY OURSELVES.

 



German Shepherd Dog Schemes

 

National Hip and Elbow Scheme

This is a scheme, set up by the German Shepherd Dog Council of Aus. Inc., where dogs and bitches are X-Rayed by a Veterinary Surgeon to assess their hips & elbows. They must have Micro chip Number and/or ear tattoo   for identification to ensure it is the correct animal being X-Rayed and their registered Kennel Name and Microchip  Number put on the x-ray plates. These are then sent to an expert radiologyst, either in Melbourne or Perth, for reading of the plates and assessment. To pass this scheme, the dog or bitch must display excellent hips and elbows, with no major changes or arthritis. ONLY then will the dog or bitch be given a pass and awarded the "A" and  "Z"  stamp/certificate,  and be approved to go on to Breed Survey and breeding.

The hips are scored and measured on 9 different areas on each hip,  and must score under 16 in total and no more than 3 in any one area to pass.  They are then given an "A" Stamp
The elbows are  measured in mm and scored accordingly, they must have no sign of arthritis and not over a 2mm gap,  to pass the scheme.  There must also be no sign of UAP (Ununited Anconeal Process)   UAP : Not Present.    They are then given a "Z" Stamp.

THE LOWER THE SCORE, THE BETTER THE HIPS AND ELBOWS.

ABOVE IS A PHOTO OF A HIP AND ELBOW CERTIFICATE, IF A DOG HAS PASSED THE HIP AND ELBOW SCHEME IN AUSTRALIA SUCCESSFULLY, THEY MUST POSSESS A CERTIFICATE LIKE THE ONE SHOWN ABOVE! 

 

 

Breed Survey Scheme

The Breed Survey scheme, set up by the G.S.D.C of Australia Inc., is a testing system conducted for German Shepherd dogs and bitches who have achieved a pass for hips and elbows, and are aged 18 months or over.  The dogs are assessed in movement as a group by a panel of Surveyors, they are required to go through a crowd of unknown people, and display no sign of fear or aggression, then stand for a gun test, where a gun is fired several times, and they must stand confidently and show no sign of anxiety or fear. The purpose of the gun test is to show steadiness of nerves which is desirable for a true all round German Shepherd. A dog may be slightly uneasy, and would still be breed worthy but would be deemed unable to work in special fields such as police work or search and rescue.

After this they have Micro Chip / Ear Tattoo verified, teeth checked for correct number and spacing, are measured for correct size (not too small, not too large), weighed and have this noted. They are then individually assessed for conformation, soundness and movement, and given a classification of Class I or Class II, if they are found suitable for BREEDING.

 


 

 About the Breed
 

Brief History

The German Shepherd breed originated in Germany in the 1890's.  A young German Cavalry officer stood on the crest of the hill, watching the sheepherder tending his flocks in the valley below.  The small dogs that tended the sheep had difficulty keeping the sheep from straying and were not able to stand up to the hungry wolves that stalked the sheep. While the young officer watched he envisioned a dog of medium size who could cope with the different sized breeds of sheep found in Germany. A dog who could stand their ground against the wolves and be protective if necessary, a dog who would be extremely intelligent, quick on his feet,  noble in appearence, trustworthy in character, physically sound so that he could work tirelessly all day long, and be born with an innate desire to please. A dog who could reason and be a companion to man.  And so it was, this day in the 1890's the idea of founding a new breed came into being.
Captain Max von Stephanitz, became the founder of the breed and in 1899 the "Verein fur Deutsche Schaferhunde (SV)" was founded (Club for German Shepherds) and came  the first official registration of a  
German Shepherd Dog - "Horand von Grafrath" SZ 1.

 

Trainability

Well bred German Shepherd's have a strong sense of loyalty and desire to please they can be trained in a variety of fields. Because of their work ethics they are widely used in  police work, army dogs, mine detection, Search & rescue, etc.  Their excellent nose can sniff out drugs and intruders and alert handlers to danger.

They are equally at home in a family life, where they love nothing better than to be close to their family members and keep a watchful eye over them.

Temperament

German Shepherds are known for their tremendous loyalty and courage.  They are direct and fearless, eager and alert. They are bold, happy, obedient and eager to learn. They are calmly confident with a serious demeanor and exhibit an almost human intelligence. They always want to be close to you, whether its laying beside you and relaxing, walking or playing games, it doesn't matter as long as they're close to you, they're happy.  They are always ready for a ball to be thrown or just sit and have cuddles. 

 

NOTE: This is describing a well bred German Shepherd of correct Temperament
and
 Character who has been correctly socialised.

 

Linebreeding/Inbreeding

On a 'Pedigree' you will often see dogs that are on both the Sire and Dam line of the pedigree.  This is called linebreeding, and is done by a breeder to keep the qualities that a particular dog produces ie. good hips, elbows, temperament etc.  It also gives and keeps a correct type.  When done correctly, there should not be problems associated with the linebreeding, it should enhance established bloodlines.

Some breeds that are numerically small resort to very close linebreeding/inbreeding,  which is not desirable, and can have serious problems associalted with it.   Since German Shepherds are numercally larger , so have a greater gene pool,  they don't have the need to linebreed as closely. Generally,  when a particular trait is desired in the breeding program, by a breeder that has knowledge of the bloodlines and wishes to retain virtues they have in their breeding lines, it would be advantageous.  As long as the "Breeder" has experience and is knowledgeable about the bloodlines they are using .

Dogs have 78 Chromosomes,  therefore they have a very large genetic inheritance mode, so selective  linebreeding is desireable to  keep the qualities within certain lines, without giving genetic abnormalities or needing to out cross.

 This differs greatly from humans who have 46 Chromosomes.

Incidentally, fish have 94 to 101 Chromosomes, therefore abnormalies are generally NOT genetic they are congenital, if they occur.

 

 



Contact Details
Debra Colson
Whittlesea, VIC, Australia
Phone : 0397161462
Email : vanharleykennels@hotmail.com

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